Keeping Tony Parker not a question, even if his future is

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The San Antonio Spurs kicked off training camp 2010 in the same fashion as last season–with much optimism, a typical Gregg Popovich dress-down of the media, and endless inquiries concerning the future of their All-Star backcourt.

Never one to tip his hand too much, or engage in needless speculation, San Antonio Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich was willing to divulge two facts with absolute certainty: Tony Parker, barring a repeat of last season’s injuries, will be the starting point guard. And more importantly, he will, as always, be a professional regardless of contract status.

“I don’t have to think about it, I know how he’s going to approach it, he’ll approach it professionally,” Popovich said. “His number one interest will be to make our team as good as he possibly can.”

Still, in the interest of framing a conversation which is certain to linger until February, I’d like to ask this hypothetical: If the Spurs knew they could not resign Tony Parker, but he had the team in contention, should they trade him?

In the short term the Spurs should benefit from the motivation of a contract year for Tony Parker. The impending free agent has vowed to attack the season with a vengeance, having dedicated the offseason to working on his game and his body.

“I’m starting the second part of my career,” Parker said. “I have to be dedicated to my body, make sure I stay healthy, eat well, get my rest. I’m not 20 anymore.”

Tony Parker is in fact 28, and should be nearing his peak as a basketball player. For all the talk of Tiago Splitter, the Spurs biggest acquisition might be the return of their All-NBA point guard. After all, no matter how much San Antonio builds up their supporting cast, they’re still just a supporting cast. Any title hopes are still built on the foundations of its Big Three.

It’s a foundation whose time is coming to an end, as Parker noted in explaining his beliefs that this season is this core’s last opportunity to win a championship.

“It’s a long season and Timmy’s like 34, going to be 35,” Parker said. “That’s why I felt like this is our last chance to win a championship. When Timmy’s gone, then it’s going to be really tough.”

Say what you will about Parker’s candor, but he’s not wrong. There are no immediate title hopes beyond Tim Duncan’s career, no matter how well the younger Spurs develop. NBA championships are won by superstars, most of which are acquired within the top five picks of the draft.

Some might throw out the Dumars/Brown Pistons  as an argument against the necessity of superstars, but realize that both Chauncey Billups and Rasheed Wallace were originally top five picks. Those Pistons teams may not have had a superstar, but they had five players who took turns as All-Stars. Joe Dumars didn’t ask Jackie Moon to win an NBA championship.

In all probability, this season represents the most important year in what’s left of Tim Duncan’s (and for that matter, Manu Ginobili) career. Given his age and contract status, any team looking to trade for Parker would be one hoping his presence would put them over the top.

Unless Chris Wallace replaces Gregg Popovich sometime in the near future, any package the Spurs take back for Parker couldn’t squander the opportunity that is this season. In short, the Spurs will not get equal value for Tony Parker in any plausible trade scenario. At least not immediately. As an enticing as a young player and draft pick(s) may be, neither of those are a help to Tim Duncan today.

The Spurs are too close to the end of Tim Duncan’s career to break up their core. They owe it to Duncan to try for their fifth championship, even at the risk of losing Parker for nothing.

And all trade scenarios should be built with only the next 2-3 years in mind. There is a nice, young nucleus quietly taking shape in San Antonio with George Hill, Dejuan Blair, Tiago Splitter, and possibly James Anderson. Unfortunately that core is probably good enough to keep the team out of the basement–where it could acquire the superstar needed to continue contending–but not good enough to secure a playoff spot.

So long as Tim Duncan remains relevant in the NBA, and he still is, the Spurs should be in contention. And if that means a one-year, future-be-damned run with Tony Parker, so be it.

Losing Parker for nothing? A fighting chance at an NBA championship is much more than nothing.

  • metalandganja

    i’d be shocked if he were traded mid-season. it simply wouldn’t make sense, for pretty much all the reasons you enumerated out. the spurs want a ring and parker gives them the best chance to get it.

  • BankShot21

    I would most certainly let the season play out. If Tony opts to leave then so be it. That 10 million that comes off the books can be used to make 2011-2012 a good one by the acquisition of a quality 4 or 5. We are pretty set at the guard position if TP decides to go elsewhere. George Hill is more than capable of running the offense and at age 25 he’ll be even better.

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  • http://www.48minutesofhell.com Timothy Varner

    Even if the Spurs lose Parker’s contract, they might not have the cash to sign someone at the same level of contract. Having said that, your point is well taken.

  • BlaseE

    Let’s say Tony plays out of his mind and we win a championship. His value will be insanely high, and he’d probably be willing to do a sign and trade if he wanted to start over somewhere else.

    If Tony gets hurt or has another off year, his value will fall a little more and teams might question if he has already peaked. The Spurs could be in a position to more easily keep him.

    It also might be worth it to hold onto him as long as possible to see how the new CBA changes this upcoming offseason.

  • Bryan

    To quote Mitch Hedberg, I “all-encompassingly” agree with this article. Anything received back in a trade for Parker would be nickels on the dollar. The overall goal is to win championships. If TP is putting the Spurs in contention for a 5th title, then the risk is worth it. The Spurs certainly wouldn’t be receiving any future franchise players. I’m all in.

  • metalandganja

    “all-encompassingly”. awesome. we miss ya mitch! =D

  • McShane

    I am naive enough to think that Tony Parker is enough of a class act to do a sign and trade IF he chooses to leave.

  • BlaseE

    @ McShane

    Why is that naive? I’m sure under the new CBA, we will be able to offer him a competitive contract. The owners and organization like to give FO’s leverage to keep their own players. That benefits Tony to do a sign and trade.

    @ Varner

    How come you haven’t tweeted anything about the Wilson Chandler for our 2011 first round pick to help facilitate a Melo trade? Aren’t you a fan of Chandler’s? I know it’s just a rumor, but it’s a good one.

  • BankShot21

    Picking up Chandlers contract would make the renegotiation of RJ’s contract superfluous. We cleared up space to get us under the luxury tax so let’s keep it that way.

  • BlaseE

    @ BankShot21

    I think we’re likely to be slightly over the luxury tax still this year. All of the arguments we used last year to justify bringing RJ in and going over the cap then still apply. It’s Holt’s money anyways, not mine. If he wants to spend it on Chandler, I’m all for it.

    We also locked RJ into a more reasonable figure and for a longer period. These are benefits whether we are over or under the tax as long as you think RJ can fit in SA.

  • Bentley

    My only problem is that Parker has repeatedly stated that he wants to stay here. I’m sure te FO is just taking the same apporach with Tony that they took with Manu last year. My guess is Tony won’t be traded at the deadline. And we will know for sure if Tony will ever be traded if he doesnt have an extension come playoff time.

  • malcedor

    thank you for stating the facts so well. excellent example of why i always read this blog, you guys say what true spurs fans know and feel, and you are able to express it with unparalleled clarity. well done.

  • RJr

    Wilson Chandler would sound nice! Let him and RJ battle it out for the starting spot

  • Francesco

    Knowing our FO, I would say that for them to trade Parker mid-season 2 things should happen:
    1- Duncan sustains a serious injury that prevents him for playing in the playoff
    2- Parker has been playing so well that we can get young players and/or picks back

    With no chance to a title, they may decide to try and replicate what happened when the admiral skipped the season: call it a season and hope for the best in the lottery.

  • Jim Henderson

    From main post:

    “If the Spurs knew they could not resign Tony Parker, but he had the team in contention, should they trade him?”

    If they can get a good enough deal for him, yes.

    “Any title hopes are still built on the foundations of its Big Three.”

    Actually, the big three playing at their best is simply a prerequisite for any title aspirations. The real “hope” lies in two or three “supporting cast” members exceeding expectations (e.g., Hill, Blair, Splitter, Anderson, etc.).

    “Say what you will about Parker’s candor, but he’s not wrong. There are no immediate title hopes beyond Tim Duncan’s career, no matter how well the younger Spurs develop.”

    I agree, and that’s why one way or another (trades, FA, drafts) we have got to continue to improve the quality of our young players, either by acquiring a star outright, or increasing our odds that one or two “budding stars” will emerge.

    “NBA championships are won by superstars, most of which are acquired within the top five picks of the draft.”

    Having “superstars” is a big help, but the Spurs have the type of organization that can win like the 2004 Pistons, with few top five picks. That said, we could use at least one, or perhaps two new top five picks over the next 3 years, hence my previous suggestion for trying to acquire one, James Harden (has chance to be a “superstar”, but overshadowed by the amazing KD) from OKC (#3 pick).

    “The Spurs are too close to the end of Tim Duncan’s career to break up their core. They owe it to Duncan to try for their fifth championship, even at the risk of losing Parker for nothing.”

    I don’t agree. I’m not squandering the Spurs future for a hail Mary, and TD would not expect us too. He’s a professional, understands the business aspects of the game, and has too much respect for the franchise to let a faded and vain attempt at short-term glory deal a blow to the future health of the organization.

    “And all trade scenarios should be built with only the next 2-3 years in mind.”

    Again, I disagree. All trade scenarios should consider the short AND long term.

    “Unfortunately that core is probably good enough to keep the team out of the basement–where it could acquire the superstar needed to continue contending–but not good enough to secure a playoff spot.”

    The future “superstar” you’re referring to here is gotten through the draft. As you very well know, there are other ways to acquire a future “superstar”.

    “So long as Tim Duncan remains relevant in the NBA, and he still is, the Spurs should be in contention.”

    Not without a talented enough supporting cast. And that remains a BIG question mark.

    “And if that means a one-year, future-be-damned run with Tony Parker, so be it.”

    That’s myopic thinking with tunnel vision that has a very good chance of consigning this franchise to mediocre performance for as long as a decade or more.

    “Losing Parker for nothing? A fighting chance at an NBA championship is much more than nothing.”

    That “fighting chance” is like David against Goliath. Myths are not actually real, and fairy tale endings are for the movies. You’re willing to torpedo our future for a 25 to 1 shot? (Vegas odds). Not me.

  • Jim Henderson

    Bryan
    October 1st, 2010 at 6:40 am

    “Anything received back in a trade for Parker would be nickels on the dollar.”

    “The Spurs certainly wouldn’t be receiving any future franchise players.”

    You do realize that these are “definitive assumptions” that are FAR from guaranteed. It’s certainly a method to foreclose any discussions of trading TP, even under the premise of the main post, that TP was going to sign a FA contract with another team a years’ end anyway. It represents ultra short term thinking, big three idol worship, and fantasy all wrapped up into one long term strategy of failure.

  • rob

    BlaseE

    “October 1st, 2010 at 6:20 am Let’s say Tony plays out of his mind and we win a championship. His value will be insanely high, and he’d probably be willing to do a sign and trade if he wanted to start over somewhere else.

    If Tony gets hurt or has another off year, his value will fall a little more and teams might question if he has already peaked. The Spurs could be in a position to more easily keep him.

    It also might be worth it to hold onto him as long as possible to see how the new CBA changes this upcoming offseason.”

    I’ve stated this same thing in different words several times. And the only way to treat Tony as trade material is to accept nothing less than all star talent as a return in the event of a trade.

    From the original post:

    “There is a nice, young nucleus quietly taking shape in San Antonio with George Hill, Dejuan Blair, Tiago Splitter, and possibly James Anderson. Unfortunately that core is probably good enough to keep the team out of the basement–where it could acquire the superstar needed to continue contending–but not good enough to secure a playoff spot.”

    This is why I believe that future recruitment of an all-star caliber player to the team could possibly happen even though San Antonio is considered a “small market” team. A core of talented players and a well managed and coached team with a winning history to boot… (no matter if it is considered “small market”) …will have a good chance at landing a superstar type of player.

    Better so than even a larger market team that shows no chance of fielding a championship team without key role players already in place.

    And if the new cba is set to have top players needing to play somewhere else because of hard cap regulations…the Spurs should be at the top of the list of super to all star talent players looking for a destination to play.

  • rob

    Jim Henderson

    “It represents ultra short term thinking, big three idol worship, and fantasy all wrapped up into one long term strategy of failure.”

    The “Short Term” is all San Antonio has at this moment considering Duncan, Ginobili AND Parker.

    It’s always been part of a dynasty aspect that hasn’t changed. And in any case..Parker will never be the caliber of player Duncan has been his entire career. I would even venture to say that Ginobili is worth more than Parker because of the intagibles that Ginobili brings to this team being more useful than what Tony brings to the team.

    And other teams in the league probably feel the same. I would speculate that the Spurs probably could have gotten more out of a Ginobili trade for x,y,z player than they could get in a Parker trade scenario.

    Parker has never been a “franchise” type player. But has played at an extremely high level due to the fact Duncan has been on the same team. Parker needed Duncan (or a teammate of that caliber) to do what he’s done so succesfully.

    But I also concede that if I were the Spurs…I wouldn’t trade Tony for nothing less than all-star talent. He’s been that valuable to this team to accept anything less. Though anything less may be what they eventually get for him in a last ditch effort to win it all again this year with Duncan.

  • JustinFL

    In my opinion, our best situation is for Tony to start the season playing at an All-Star level and trade him. As much as I am excited about our team and watching them this year, it will take a near miracle for us to win the title. If we do re-sign him doesn’t that mean our money is tied up until Tim re-signs or retires? In essence, we are stuck with the big three for better or worse until Tim retires. The other ideal situation is to get as far as possible this year and then do a sign-and-trade after the season. That seems to be risky and only the FO would know how probable that is. The good thing would be it gives us one last Hoorah! with the “Big 3.”
    Now it should go without saying the trade has to be of equal or better value or no deal. Of course, that would be open to interpretation and heavy discussion. I love Tony, but the future of the Spurs hangs in the balance. It just seems to me the Spurs would be better off getting younger superstar caliber talent and or quality draft picks. We’ve slacked on defense and rebounding the past few years, so maybe Tony’s trade could help rectify this with a talented frontcourt player.
    Question? Is there any truth to the Wilson Chandler trade involving our 2011 draft pick?
    If so details please anyone.

  • http://www.48minutesofhell.com Lenneezz

    It would not be in the Spurs character to trade Tony midseason. It would take a catastrophe such as Manu being out for the entire year before the all star break to “spur” a midseason trade. (I could not resist the pun.)

    It was correctly noted that a sign and trade after the season would be in Tony and the franchise’s best interest. I do expect this to happen and I still expect the Knicks to be the destination for Tony.

    They have the players to give up. Randolph and Galinari would be a nice score and Felton would be the throw in. I appreciate and respect what Tony has done for SA but this is a business. Putting one player before the long term health of the franchise would be a costly mistake.

  • Jim Henderson

    Lenneezz
    October 1st, 2010 at 4:51 pm

    “It was correctly noted that a sign and trade after the season would be in Tony and the franchise’s best interest. I do expect this to happen and I still expect the Knicks to be the destination for Tony.”

    I agree, but the primary premise of the main post was that TP is playing well with the Spurs in “contention” as we approached the trade deadline, and we knew TP was going to leave as a FA at the end of the season. And even though we might lose TP for nothing, we should not consider trading him if the trade “might” not help us in our quest for a title “this year”. I’m not a big fan of “trading deadline” deals myself, although if the deal was better than we could realistically hope for at season’s end then it should be on the table in my view. That said, I do think the more likely scenario, if TP were not to sign an extension a la Manu, is to work the best sign & trade deal that we can, with NY being a likely trading partner.

  • http://www.48minutesofhell.com Lenneezz

    Jim Henderson
    October 1st, 2010 at 5:11 pm

    “And even though we might lose TP for nothing, we should not consider trading him if the trade “might” not help us in our quest for a title “this year”.”

    I really don’t consider trading Tony at/before the trade deadline to be a real possibility.

    The rodeo road trip isn’t even over until Feb 17, 2011. That is approximately right at the trade deadline. I seriously doubt that Pop and RC will be ready to get rid of Tony at that point because that would basically admit giving up on the 2011 championship.

    Even if the trade brought in “equal value”, there will be a period of time that the new player(s) would need to get used to the Spurs system. Bringing in new players, even if they are very talented, at February is going to be a big problem for winning a 2011 championship. Basically, trading Tony at all this midseason would signal that the Spurs don’t think they can win the 2011 championship.

    I’m not really nervous about losing Tony for nothing. It is in his best interest to do a sign and trade. He will do what will pay him the most, no doubt. He won’t give up money and contract years just to stick it to the Spurs.

  • spursfanbayarea

    Well everyone is assuming that parker can do a sign and trade at the end of the season. The problem with this assumption is that there may be a lockout. There is no guarantee that the next CBA will allow for as generous salaries. If parker wants to get paid under current CBA he would most likely have to sign an extension during the season and if traded other teams would want him to have an extension. Teams will not give up good talent for a short term rental.

    Right now everyone is saying the right things but the longer it drags out with a contract, things could get messier later on in the year. Also if the new agreement is favored toward owners and has lower salaries, that also puts us at a disadvantage when trading for other players whose value is based on previous CBA. Imagine if new CBA were to limit parker to 10 million per year. What other player out there is equal to his value at 10 million. You would not even be able to trade him for lesser talent who have big contracts. Everyone was shocked when Jefferson opted out, but he knew the next CBA was going to be different. I believe most players who have the opportunity to do contracts will take care of them before the year is over.

  • idahospur

    If Parker leaves, keep him away from LA and Miami.

  • Jim Henderson

    Lenneezz
    October 1st, 2010 at 7:18 pm

    “I really don’t consider trading Tony at/before the trade deadline to be a real possibility.”

    As I said in my previous post:

    “I’m not a big fan of “trading deadline” deals myself, although if the deal was better than we could realistically hope for at season’s end then it should be on the table in my view.”

    And the reason is because we NEED to be thinking of more than THIS season. If we get an offer that should really help us over the next 2-3 years and beyond (with the premise that TP will be gone next year as a free agent and we’ll have little to show for it), that offer should be seriously considered (unless perhaps if in February our team looked much stronger than expected [top two WC], with BIG jumps in Blair, Hill, & Splitter’s games, and a surprise contribution from somebody like Anderson – all of which happening this year is a highly unlikely scenario in my view).

    “I’m not really nervous about losing Tony for nothing.”

    I understand, but that wasn’t the premise that Jesse set up. Also, we may not have as good of bargaining power for a trade at the end of the year. TP might like a sign & trade, but the team acquiring him knows that they have some leverage on not giving up too much for him because he’s a FA anyway. I say you get the best deal for TP when you can get it, whether that’s at the trade deadline or in the off-season (again, that’s assuming that TP is leaving, which may not be the case).

    spursfanbayarea
    October 1st, 2010 at 8:48 pm

    Good points about the upcoming CBA.

  • SEANB

    First if you know POP and Tim Dncan,its about winning a 5th champioship and there is no way he trading Parker and mess up chemestry during the season,u better be offering superstar that come in and make impact for that to happend.Remember this spurs management is already 2 steps ahead,they already have they option’s set in place of what they offer tony and what they do if he plans to leaves. POP has already told Parker if he part future of this team,we as fans and media ,dont know yet.Believe me fans ,Parker ,Jefferson ,Splitter is future and foundatation for next 5-6 yrs.as MANU and DUNCAN sail into sunset. Richard Jefferson geting 4 yr contract and Splitter coming over,is part plan to keep tony so this team is not lottery team when Duncan retires.What is great though,is they may have already gotten other pieces those 3 with BLAIR and ANDERSON quicker than they expected,so they just have to develop them in next 3 yrs.If PARKER does leave for more moneyat end season,he will do sign and trade for max money depening on new policy next year.B ut i believe PARKER will sign extension beforeend season like GINOBILLI did. Remember u heard it here first HAHA!!!

  • SEANB

    THE big 3 now is PARKER,GINOBILLI,DUNCAN,the big 3 future is JEFFERSON,PARKER,SPLITTER, and because of they luck in last 3 draft lottery picks ,They may have gotten the other pieces faster than expected in GEORGE HILL,DUJAN BLAIR,
    JAMES ANDERSON

  • http://www.48minutesofhell.com Lenneezz

    Jim Henderson
    October 2nd, 2010 at 3:20 am

    “I say you get the best deal for TP when you can get it, whether that’s at the trade deadline or in the off-season (again, that’s assuming that TP is leaving, which may not be the case).”

    I agree with ya Jim. If for whatever reason there is heavy demand for Tony at the trade deadline and somebody is willing to overpay than the trade needs to be seriously considered. UNLESS, the team has positioned itself into serious contention, as you noted.

  • Hobson13

    SEANB
    October 2nd, 2010 at 6:13 am
    “But i believe PARKER will sign extension beforeend season like GINOBILLI did.”

    I think that’s a possibility if the Spurs don’t get blown away by a trade offer and if Parker doesn’t mind taking less than top dollar. On the other hand, if Parker wants big $$$ we may just do a sign and trade in the summer.

    Jim Henderson
    October 2nd, 2010 at 3:20 am
    “I’m not a big fan of “trading deadline” deals myself, although if the deal was better than we could realistically hope for at season’s end then it should be on the table in my view.”

    I agree. It would absolutely tear up any team chemistry if Parker were bundled off in February. It’s simply too late in the season to change course that radically. However, If a deal could get done by say Christmas, then I think it’s a different story. If a team is really serious about Parker, they’ll make a legit offer before the middle of the season.

    Here’s my take on the Parker situation: I think this could go a number of different ways. Either Parker gets traded BEFORE the deadline or we wait until summer to see how things pan out. An extension during the season is possible, but I don’t think it’s probable. Unless I’ve missed my guess, this is Parker’s last chance to score a fat contract in his career and with a new CBA coming up he will want big money(meaning at least what Manu signed for) AND a LONG TERM SECURITY (meaning the max 6 years). I can’t imagine Parker signing for less than 6 years.

    We paid an aging Manu $13mil/season. I think Parker will want a bit more than that since he is still in his prime (albeit in his later prime years) This is speculation, but my guess is that Parker would want a 6 year $90 mil deal. Even is he simply wanted equal salary to Manu, we’d be looking at something close to a 6 year $80 mil deal. Would anyone here want to sign a 28 year old PG to this kind of deal? Not me.

    Besides, with a new CBA on the horizon, overspent teams like the Lakers, Magic, Celtics, and others could be seriously screwed over the longer term. We also have to keep in mind cap flexibility in signing/resigning younger players. With RJ plus the Big 3, we have almost $53 mil in cap space already committed. I’m not trying to rain on the Parker love fest, but let’s put some numbers to the situation and see if everyone still feels the same.

  • Jim Henderson

    Hobson13
    October 2nd, 2010 at 8:44 am

    ” This is speculation, but my guess is that Parker would want a 6 year $90 mil deal. Even is he simply wanted equal salary to Manu, we’d be looking at something close to a 6 year $80 mil deal. Would anyone here want to sign a 28 year old PG to this kind of deal? Not me.”

    I agree, if someone’s going to give him that kind of deal it’s not going to be me. If TP’s “back” this year, the most I go is 6 years for 70 mil., or 5 for 65 mil. Parker has a lot of miles on his legs. If he wants MAX security, he’s gotta do it for just under 12 mil. per. After all, we’re not the Laker’s here. And the fact is, we could get outbid on these numbers, although if it’s if it’s done after the season who knows exactly how the new CBA will influence the process. If Parker wants the most money and security, he might be better off going to NY (along with McDyess) between 12/15/10 & the trade deadline for Felton, Randolph, and Chandler. I’d be open to that kind of a deal, as long as we signed those guys longer term.

  • rob

    I’m not in agreement with others that think trading Parker now or before the end of the season is what’s best for this team at this time.

    IMO the Spurs have a better chance of winning a championship this year with Parker on the team than by getting another player in replacement of Parker.

    And I do believe that in the event that the new CBA places a hard cap on teams…the Spurs will have just as good a shot of landing an all star in replacement of Parker if Parker decides to leave next year and/or the team can’t get value for Parker in a sign and trade scenario.

    It’s not like all the other teams and players in this league won’t be affected the same way. Which will leave the door wide open for attracting good talent for the future if the Spurs have already secured a great support/role squad at a fiscally beneficial scenario if the new CBA does in fact place a hard cap on teams.

  • Jim Henderson

    rob
    October 2nd, 2010 at 11:11 am

    “I’m not in agreement with others that think trading Parker now or before the end of the season is what’s best for this team at this time.”

    I don’t know anyone on this thread that thinks it’s best to “trade Parker now or by the end of the season”. Some of us have raised concerns about not getting enough back for Parker should he want to leave through FA, or paying too much for him if he wants to stay. I personally think we need to keep an open mind about moving TP if we can get the right pieces back because I don’t think it’s wise for the short & long term health of the franchise to “only” consider “this” season in any such negotiations. The fact is with or without Parker we do not have a good chance of winning a title this year (25-1 with Parker, 35-1 without? What’s the difference?). We can’t afford to potentially risk our future because of pie-in-the-sky hopes of a 2011 championship. That would be irresponsible. Now if Parker wants to stay, wants to accept a reasonable extension, and we don’t get great offers from other teams for him, than I’m all for TP staying around for another 5-6 years. However, I do wonder how we’re going to replace TD once he further declines in the next 2-3 years without trading someone of value. Because without picking up at least one other star in the next couple of years that plays great at both ends, our playoff/title hopes are going to fade, with or without Parker.

    “And I do believe that in the event that the new CBA places a hard cap on teams… the Spurs will have just as good a shot of landing an all star in replacement of Parker….”

    Fine, but we don’t know what’s going to happen with the new CBA. And this is what Tim Varner said earlier on this thread:

    “Even if the Spurs lose Parker’s contract, they might not have the cash to sign someone at the same level of contract.”

    In addition, we may not have has much leverage with other suitor’s when TP becomes a FA. He may be able to get five years for plenty of money without the Spurs help, so a prospective acquirer may not have a ton of incentive to give up the farm so that TP can earn a few more dollars & another year on his contract. I think you may be just a bit too sanguine about the prospects of our “take” should TP enter free agency, even when taking into account a new CBA in 2011.

  • http://www.48minutesofhell.com Lenneezz

    Jim Henderson
    October 2nd, 2010 at 11:08 am

    “I agree, if someone’s going to give him that kind of deal it’s not going to be me. If TP’s “back” this year, the most I go is 6 years for 70 mil., or 5 for 65 mil. Parker has a lot of miles on his legs.”

    My major issue with Tony is how long before there is a significant decline in his game. For that reason, I would not give him a 5 or 6 year deal. The real killer would be 2 years at 13 mil/yr when Tony can’t get past his man.

    Now, if we’re talking about 4 yrs for $52 Mil than RC should be listening.

  • http://www.sanantoniospurs.com SPURS FAN SINCE 89

    Unless it’s a no-brainer, remember what Bufford said. Well to me a no brainer would be CP3, especially if TP shows this year that he lost a step and isn’t as explosive as he’s been in the past years. Without TP’s explosiveness, he is a useless, decent (I’m being generous here) shooting guard. What makes TP so dangerous and different than other guards is his explosivenss. eg…..It’s kinda like when LJ used to play for the chiefs. He was always a big bruiser who ran down hill, but he was so deadly because of his explosiveness. Once he lost his explosiveness, and a few steps, he was just a normal big slow running back. Same thing with TP.
    I can’t sress this enough that the Spurs need to keep getting bigger, if they ever want to contend with L.A. again. Let’s face it Spurs fans unfortunately L.A. is still the team to beat in the West; but 2-8 in my opinion is still up for grabs. But if the Spurs don’t get bigger Bynum, Gasol, Artest, Odom, and Ratliff (who the Spurs let go last year) will be way too big for us. Also Pop has never found a way to stop Kobe in my opinion. The only Kobe stopper was Bowen.
    In my opinion we have way too many shooting guards. We need to trade a couple of them for some more bigs. We still need to get Duncan more help.
    Beat L.A.!!! I still want my revenge especially from 04 but also from 01, 02, & 08.
    GO SPURS!!!

  • Monty

    I checked espn’s trade machine and Spurs could trade Tony (to NY) for AIgoudala and Philadelphia would get Curry’s dead body and Wilson Chandler’s quite performing one. I couldn’t add a draft pick to NY but I believe it’s possible to make it.
    BTW: Trading straight: Tony for AI works also (it makes no sense for 76’ers).
    BTW (2): That 3-way trade can be expanded to: Tony + Dalembert’s trade exception to NY; Chandler, Curry, Gallinari to 76’ers; AI to SAS.
    http://games.espn.go.com/nba/tradeMachine?tradeId=38gp79t

    I am aware that the value of AI is quite high now and Philadelphia wouldn’t be interested in trading him without also unloading a fat contract of Brand.

  • rob

    Jim Henderson

    “I think you may be just a bit too sanguine about the prospects of our “take” should TP enter free agency, even when taking into account a new CBA in 2011.”

    Perhaps in retrospect to the Spurs I am. And I understand planning for the future sans Duncan will be quite a challenge and needs to be addressed sooner than later.

    And I was all for trading Tony in the summer prior to the season starting in order to garnish that kind of talent. But now that the season has started, I’m all for Tony staying for the rest of the season with the Spurs. Because in my view I can’t see someone else…even at all star level…coming in and helping the Spurs hopefully win it all this year after the season has started.

    And whether one is in agreement with that or not…I think it is the direction/decision the Spurs are heading into the 2010-2011 season. One last surge of the big 3 trying to win another title. Damn the torpedos full speed ahead kind of mentality. And I hope they can pull it off. And I believe they have better talent than last year to have a legitiment shot at a title if the big 3 can stay healthy for just one more season.

    Does that bode well for the Spur’s future? Well…one can’t know how to prepare for the future if the future of the CBA is in question. Might as well give it all you can with who brought you there before and worry about the future when you have a better understanding what the rules will be in the future.

  • rob

    A question to all. Is it harder for a perimeter player to grasp the Spurs system than it is for a big man/post player?

    I ask because I was wondering if it may be easier to bring another big later in the season than it would be to bring in another wing. And the glutten of guards that the Spurs have brought in early may be easier to trade later to get another big than to bring in another perimeter/wing player at mid season with regards to learning the system.

    Hence the reasoning for so many guards early in the season so as to make sure the team has the best they can have for the entire season and worry later about securing another big as the season progresses???

  • Titletown99030507

    I’d rather rebuild on the fly like the FO is doing. At least we have another 10 years of being in contention for a championship. Get over Timmy everybody there will be other special players but in other positions. We may not ever get another Duncan but there could be a great center in the making if he doesn’t keep getting hurt. Why do we keep saying we owe it to Timmy. Sorry but without Parker and Ginobili you only have 1 Championship not 4. Don’t make it personal rebuild on the fly and be championship competitive each year. This FO knows how to stay in contention every year they have a formula and it works. Go get Wilson Chandler and heck why your at it get Gallinari too. Parker will be happy in New York. And we’ll add firepower to the now improving roster as it is and everything will be ok. In a perfect world I’d like to keep Tony, dial back 7 of Tim’s years, as well as Ginobili’s and we all can live in a harmonious state. Uh no. We all know things change eventually but it doesn’t mean they have to be for the worse.

  • quincyscott

    Going to the basement does not guarantee anything, either. The Spurs dipped down there twice and came up with Robinson and Duncan. But how many times have teams like the Clippers been on the bottom, and still have little to show for it? How many sure thing players, like Greg Oden, have had career altering injuries? The draft is a crap shoot.

    Any way you slice it, the Spurs have had an amazing run for about the past twelve years. Talent, good coaching, teamwork and, yes, luck, have all contributed. I hope all of us Spurs fans are well aware of how blessed we’ve been, and still are. For how long, nobody can say. The Celtics of last season proved that sometimes a window is not nearly as closed as most people think it is.

    And now, would you please join me in a moment of silence for Cleveland fans…

  • GitErDun

    If we were to trade Parker it would in my mind have to be for a top quality YOUNG BIG. Two that come to my mind would be Derrick Favors (Nets) or Blake Griffin (Clippers). Either one is likely to turn into an All-Star or possibly a Superstar in the coming years.

  • BankShot21

    Oh how I’d love to see Gallo in the silver and black….Chandler not so much. As I stated earlier we are fine at the PG position if TP was leave or get traded. Hill has proved he’s comfortable running the pick and roll and then there’s that guy that was only the best player in the league until his nose got broken…GINOOOOOOOOOOBILI (shout out to Barkley). Let’s all settle down and stop acting as though our FO is running the franchise into the murky depths of no return. They are doing a pretty damn good job of keeping our beloved Spurs relevant in an ever evolving league. Duncan can still produce 20 and 10 if he played 35 mins a game. His efficiency hasn’t changed much if at all. I feel good about this season. I think we’re going to catch a lot of teams off guard. And as for Mr. Jim Henderson and his Vegas odds….You are aware that the undefeated Mike Tyson was a heavy Vegas favorite the night of his fight against Buster Douglas.

  • Jim Henderson

    rob
    October 3rd, 2010 at 6:57 am

    “A question to all. Is it harder for a perimeter player to grasp the Spurs system than it is for a big man/post player?”

    Yeah, I don’t think that there’s any meaningful difference between perimeter & bigs grasping the system. Pop just is desperately searching for the best guy that can defend and hit the three out on the perimeter. Hence, the number of shooters on the roster. Unfortunately they happen to be mostly guards, an area that we’re not lacking in talent, and the overall age is lower than at the 4/5. I think we could use a younger big with some talent (especially) more than another young guard with talent (especially defensively). The SF is the one we could use, especially a defender that can nail the spot-up three from the corner. Simmons is our best hope.

  • Francesco

    I see Gallinari’s name gets tossed quite frequently.
    I don’t think NY would ever trade him to get Parker.
    Gallo is younger and his skill set is much harder to replace than Parker’s. Plus NY already has Felton, who is not as good as TP but younger and with a more manageble contract.

    In fact, if reports out of NY are accurate, it would seem the Knicks wouldn’t part from Gallinari even for Melo…

  • Hunter

    The future will be shaky no matter what happens with tony parker. I Say GO FOR THE CHAMPIONSHIP tony has been with us for years and I don’t see him leaving. i don’t know where thats coming from but i think he will stay if not i have one really stupid but quite possible hope. Duncan opts out sighns 4 10 million less we trade jefferson for draft picks and dont resign anyone else then we make a move for kevin durant.